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20131028
20131105
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
that there was something to justify lethal force? >> there's a fabricated fbi report that came out the very next day before they realized there was a video, that claimed the border patrol agent was surrounded and being pelted by rocks and in fear for his life. >> hilliard read this fbi statement to bobbie during her sworn testimony. this was her response: >> that was not true. there was no one surrounding him throwing rocks. >> what happened next points to a problem unique to killings that cross international lines. sergio's family tried to sue the agent who shot their son. but the federal judge in el paso dismissed the case. though the bullet traveled from the us, it landed in mexico. the united states constitution and any accountability did not travel with it. >> you have a child whose family cannot seek redress within the civil justice system for that conduct and it occurred only because of the vacuum which is our border. it's like walking out into the wild wild west and you're standing there at high noon and whatever you do is not reviewed anymore. on august 20th, al jazeera america introduced >>cross-
is probably the best case. fbi gave that an open hearing, that's a great one to use. just think, how do you connect the dots between the foreign intelligence agencies, and the domestic? i think these are the best tools; we need tools to stop it. >> the case in san diego was about $8,500 that went to somalia? >> yeah, and i don't have the specifics, but it's open record so you can pull that up pretty easy. >> this is one of the major cases they use to justify these programs and he just told us that he didn't know the specifics of it. >> there has, to my knowledge with classified clearance, never ever been a terrorist attack in the united states that's been foiled by use of any of this information. not even once, and they've been collecting this information since right after 9/11. so, there's just no basis for it. it just isn't any use. one thing that you hear from them is that they are looking for a needle in a haystack. what they're actually doing is creating a haystack and then inserting a needle in it. >> we're here today for a very simple reason, to defend the fourth amendment. >> after
. >> are there fbi agents on site visiting with the victims. i can't comment on that don't know i'm sorry can you tell us why they were brought here today. >> sure. well when an event like this occurs, we prepare for as many as 50 victims. he iso we clear out rooms and gt ready and get all of your personnel and this is something we are well prepared to do. and as it turned out very thankfully we received only three. >> have you received any patients that have died? >> no three patients one krit critical and on two fair. can you tell us more about the description. their ages perhaps? >> unfortunately i can't due to privacy concerns and they are details i don't have. they come with little information and we take care of the injuries and move to the next patient. i'm sure that will be released later as we gather more information. >> do you have another ucla. no sir i'm not sure about that. it's unclear at this time. they came in and they were injured and we take care of them. zplthat's it. nul can you tell us about the injury? >> i can't. adult children? >> iadult male. >> when do you expect the two
's interesting actually last year the fbi actually investigated golden living and came out with a report earlier this year that said they were fraudulently charging the us government for not only poor care but care that was actually harmful to their own patients. the company paid a fine of more than $600,000 to settle the case involving two atlanta facilities, and signed a corporate integrity agreement to improve care, but it didn't have to admit liability. >> the way the corporate model is set up, it's so convoluted, so complex, the nursing home owners are so protective of accountability, multiple layers upon layers of companies that protect the corporate decision makers. >> madeline leftridge lived at a golden living center in southaven, mississippi. she died at age 72 from complications due to alzheimer's, according to her daughters carmen belton and lisa perkins. they believe their mother unduly suffered at the center. hospital records show that she was dehydrated, and that she'd developed a severe ulcer. >> her back was open. and it was [cried] ... it was probably three inches deep in her b
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)